Ben Franklin's Guide to Wealth
Release Date  
Pages   122
ISBN-13  978-1-57324-953-9
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Ben Franklin's Guide to Wealth

Being a 21st Century Treatise on What It Takes to Live a Rich Life

By Erin Barrett, Jack Mingo

Ben Franklin's Guide to Wealth is the modern version of the treatise The Way of Wealth by Richard Saunders, one of Ben Franklin's many pseudonyms. Franklin practiced what he preached in the treatise, and it made him rich enough to have a full life, travel extensively, and follow his intellectual musings, which in turn led him to become an accomplished scientist, inventor, political activist, diplomat, and writer. Franklin wasn't born rich. He built his legacy using his intelligence, curiosity, natural good sense, and proclivity for thrift and hard work. When he died, he left a fortune. Barrett and Mingo bring practicing what Franklin preached up to date for today's busy lifestyles. It's time to get back to financial basics. It's time to think about what "rich" really means. It might mean not hiring someone to do lawn work, saving some money, and sharing time spent together as a family. It's time to look for guidance from America's original financial guru, Ben Franklin.

Ben Franklin's Guide to Wealth shows readers how to apply Franklin's financial wisdom to their own lives. Quotes from the original treatise such as "If you have something to do tomorrow, do it today" and "Leisure is time for doing something useful," are followed by the authors' downtoearth commentary. Barrett and Mingo--history and trivia buffs--offer their own sage advice on a range of financial basics, including debt, thrift, the value of work and business, developing financial responsibility, money and time, and preparing for the future. As the authors attest in the Introduction, we should listen to the way of Ben Franklin because "it works." A clever, wise, and fun book, the financial advice in Ben Franklin's Guide to Wealth works as well today as it did 250 years ago.

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