Drama Queens

By

An irreverent, intriguing, and masterfully researched romp through the lives of the hottest Hollywood vamps, producers, directors, critics, gossip columnists, stunt women, and allaround nonconformists of moviedom. From the sultry sirens of silent films to today's glamour goddesses, Drama Queens takes you on screen and off to capture the feuds, fetishes, and finest moments of Hollywood's most divine divas.

Read more

Loose Cannons

By

From princesses to prostitutes to movie stars and supermodels, plus a few radicals and racecar drivers, Loose Cannons showcases hundreds of female moversandshakers, including Oprah Winfrey, Maria Callas, Michelle Pfeifer, and Catherine the Great, at their chatty, catty, and deliciously subversive best.

Read more

Wild Women in the Kitchen

By

Not Your Typical Betty Crocker Cookbook

Feminism meets cooking in this addition to the Wild Woman series, pairing recipes by famous female chefs Lynett Rohrer and Nicole Alper with food trivia, stories, and quotes by women.

So you think a woman’s place is in the kitchen. With Betty Drapers and “make me a sandwich” mantras, it’s easy to forget that women have been cooking up a storm for quite some time. Catherine de’Medici was the Johnny Appleseed of Italian food. Nancy Hart shot a Royalist soldier for barging in and interrupting dinner. Turns out, these women really can take the heat. Maybe it’s best to stay out of their kitchen.

Unconventional females and unconditionally good food. Part cookbook, and part women’s history, Wild Women in the Kitchen features 101 recipes to complement the culinary contributions of famous females. With starter recipes curated specifically to these tough cookies, this book replaces female stereotypes with empowering, historical context. Inside, learn about Cleopatra's orgiastic oysters and:

  • Break bread with Golda Meir
  • Serve cucumber sandwiches in Natalie Barney’s Parisian salon
  • Bring over Canard a l’orange like Catherine de’Medici

If you’re in need of a feminist cookbook, and enjoyed reads like The Little House CookbookWomen's Libation!The Little Women Cookbook, or A Woman's Place; then you’ll savor Wild Women in the Kitchen.

Read more

Wild Women

By

Badass Victorian Women

Enjoy a fascinating and sometimes humorous glimpse into the lives of over one hundred, 19th-century Victorian era American women who refused to whittle themselves down to the Victorian model of proper womanhood. Included in Wild Women are 50-black-and-white photos from the era.

During the Victorian era a woman’s pedestal was her prison.

“Women should not be expected to write, or fight, or build, or compose scores. She does all by inspiring man to do all.” ─ Ralph Waldo Emerson

“There is nothing more dangerous for a young woman than to rely chiefly upon her intellectual powers, her wit, her imagination, her fancy.” ─ Godey’s Lady’s Book magazine

“…join in checking this mad, wicked folly of ‘Women’s Rights’ with all its attendant horrors on which her poor feeble sex is bent.” ─ Queen Victoria of England

But, scores of nineteenth-century American women chose to live life on their terms. In this book you will meet women who refused to remain on a Victorian pedestal.

In San Francisco a courtesan appeared as a plaintiff in court, suing her clients for fraud. In Montana a laundress in her seventies decked a gentleman who refused to pay his bill. A forty-three-year-old schoolteacher plunged down Niagara Falls in a wooden barrel. A frail lighthouse keeper pulled twenty-two sinking sailors out of the ocean off Rhode Island. A pair of Colorado madams fought a public pistol duel over their mutual beau. Two lady lovebirds were legally wed in Michigan. An ad hoc abolitionist spirited away scores of slaves on the Underground Railroad. A Secessionist spy swallowed a secret message as she was arrested, claiming that no one could capture her soul.

Readers of books for women such as Women Who Run with the Wolves or Badass Affirmations will love this book about Victorian women who refused to accept the gender roles of their day.

Read more